Welcome to the New FasTest

Safe, Reliable. Fast. Standard and Custom Sealing Connection Tools for Leak Test and Fluid Transfer Applications.
FasTest Sealing Connection Tools significantly increase operational throughput and reduce manufacturing costs.

Epson Robots Names Air Automation Engineering an Authorized Service Center

Partnership is Part of an Initiative to Increase Technical Support in the Midwest

CARSON, Calif., – March 16, 2020 – As part of an initiative to increase technical support in the
Midwest US, Epson Robots, the #1 SCARA robot manufacturer in the world, today announced it
is expanding its relationship with Air Automation Engineering (AAE), a leading automation
solutions provider. The partnership establishes AAE as an official Authorized Epson Service
Center and will expand beyond selling Epson Robots, automation products and integrated
solutions to include maintenance and repair of the broad installed base of Epson robots, helping
to ensure fast repair turnaround times throughout the Upper Midwest.

The partnership with Air Automation Engineering involves all Epson Robots automation
products, including the large lineup of SCARA and 6-Axis robots and the lineup of integrated
solutions. The company has helped Epson Robots introduce award-winning robot-based
automation solutions throughout the Upper Midwest, including Iowa, North Dakota, South
Dakota, Minnesota, Nebraska, and Wisconsin.

“We’re pleased to expand our relationship with Epson Robots and help our joint customers in
the Upper Midwest,” said Paul Wood, general manager, Air Automation Engineering. “Our team
of long-term professionals focus on providing the best repair and support services so our
customers benefit from a high return on investment.”
“Air Automation has a long history of providing automation solutions and we are looking forward
to adding them as an Authorized Epson Service Center for the Upper Midwest,” said Tom
Versfelt, VP Commercial Sales Epson. “The company’s expertise and commitment to offering a
full service and support portfolio help set our customers up for maximum productivity with Epson
robots.”

About Air Automation Engineering
Air Automation Engineering (AAE) was founded in 1978 and is recognized as a leading
distributor in the Greater Upper Midwest. The company supports its manufacturing customers
with application support, repair, value added services & inventory from 2 locations in North
Dakota & Minnesota. AAE has passion for automation opportunities with the personnel &
support programs to provide a solution that delivers increased productivity, enhanced machine
safety and improved ergonomics. For more information, visit www.airautomation.com

 

Brushless servo motors with integrated controller…

Brushless servo motors with integrated controller…
  • Reduced material costs
  • Reduced labor costs
  • Better quality and reliability
  • Fewer connections, less wiring
Call or email us for a demonstration or
on-site application evaluation.
Toll Free: (800) 231-9205

NEW Magnetic Gripper: Fast, Efficient Control from Compact

Features:
  • Fewer moving parts, no fingers to design or manufacture, fast grip speed and minimal maintenance.
  • Fewer tool changes required because the same magnetic gripper can pick up various shapes.
  • Good for use in place of vacuum cups.
  • Excellent for end-of-arm tooling with the very small size-to-weight ratio.
  • No electricity required

 

The Revolutionary Epson T3 All-In-One Scara Robot For Under $7500

Looking to automate your factory without wasting time or money on complex slide-based solutions? Now you can – with the groundbreaking T3 All-in One Scara robot from Epson. This innovative robot offers fast, easy integration and takes less time to install than most automation solutions available. With 110 V and 220 V power and a wide variety of options, including integrated vision guidance, the T3 All-in-One truly has it all.

Attend Our Automation Seminar & Learn Where “Gripping Meets Robotics”

On Thursday January 11th 2018: Discover Schunk’s End-of-Arm Expertise! For Every Robot, Every Industry, Every Handling Task.

Air Automation will be conducting a “Day of Automation” seminar for our valued customers free of charge. You will learn hands on: The newest automation products from Schunk including: Robotic grippers, accessories & linear motion actuators.

Limited space available. Register today!

Thursday January 11th
Air Automation Eng.
230 Commerce Circle S.
Fridley, MN 55432
Seminar hours:
8:30am-1:30pm
Snack & lunch provided

Enter to win a Makita 18V LXT Lithium-Ion Cordless Bluetooth Radio!

Tolomatic Electric high force linear actuator is tough enough to process lumber

The lumber industry has relied on the toughness and high force capabilities of hydraulic cylinders for years.  But lately that reliance has been shaken.  Hydraulic cylinders leak and can contaminate the fragile eco-systems in which lumber processing operates.  Plus, hydraulic systems are only 40-55% efficient and cylinders require frequent maintenance.  When combined, these factors can make hydraulic cylinders an expensive choice in the long run. The introduction of electric high force linear actuators has given the lumber industry a new option for linear motion

Lumber planing machine needs leak-free actuator

A manufacturer of lumber processing equipment was using hydraulic cylinders to position rollers on their planing machine. The manufacturer needed a robust, long-lasting alternative, though. Their customers were concerned that leaking hydraulic fluid would damage the environment.  Customers also didn’t like the high total cost of ownership of hydraulics due to a combination of maintenance costs and the low efficiency of hydraulic systems. Also, low and high temperatures impaired hydraulic cylinder performance.

Electric high force linear actuator is solution

The application requires force output of 7,000 lbf (31,138 kN) and speed of 6 in/sec (152 mm/sec).  Our RSA64 HT electric high-force linear actuator with roller screw meets this challenge, allowing the OEM to eliminate the leaky, expensive hydraulic system.

Not only does the RSA-HT meet the application’s force and speed specifications, the electric rod actuator delivers 70-80% system efficiency and has minimal maintenance requirements.  The RSA operates without a glitch in all temperatures and is sealed with an optional IP67 package to handle the wet, dusty environment.

The RSA roller screw electric rod actuator withstands shock loads caused when the machine’s rollers encounter gaps between boards travelling through the planer. Due to these high shock loads, a custom steel head with an integrated trunnion is used.

POSTED BY AARON DIETRICH (Tolomatic)

FasTest Quick Connectors for Leak & Pressure Testing

FasTest Quick Connectors for Leak & Pressure Testing

FasTest Inc. is the leader in leak and pressure testing quick connectors for a wide variety of manufacturing industries. FasTest uses advanced engineering to create safe, reliable connections for various tubes and threaded profiles. Learn more about the different FasTest product lines available through Air Automation Engineering below!

 

Shedding Light On Encoders In Solar Energy Applications

Article by: Kuebler Inc.

As solar energy continues to grow as a modern-day source of power, components must be designed to ensure continuous and efficient operation of the energy generation process. Because heliostats are often placed in remote desert areas, they are exposed to a number of harsh environmental factors, such as high temperatures during the day, dust exposure and daily temperature swings.

To keep the system running smoothly, encoders, which are used in the control of the mirrors, must combine ruggedness with innovative technologies, yielding a reliable product that can perform under these tough conditions.

There are a number of factors in the energy generation process that can help determine if an encoder is up to the challenge.

Elevation and azimuth position control. Heliostats demand high precision in order to maximize the amount of sunlight being received. Therefore, the efficiency of the overall system depends on their positioning accuracy in both elevation and azimuth. Here, precision optical encoders are best suited for the job.

Angular position control of Parabolic Trough Systems. Parabolic mirrors concentrate sunlight onto a heliostat’s receiver pipe—a process that requires rugged, yet flexible encoders. Depending on installation space, simple magnetic rotary encoders or inclinometers can be used in order to accurately measure the system’s angular position.

Rugged outdoor design. Encoders must integrate a number of characteristics that make them suitable for outdoor applications. These include robust housing, a wide temperature range, high resistance to shock and vibration, insensitivity to interference or magnetic disturbances and long service life.

Customizability. It is important for encoder manufacturers to work together with engineering teams to design custom control or motion solutions for solar. Depending on the application, the encoder may need to work with a wide variety of additional sensing systems, integrated drives or other types of feedback devices. To make integration easier, look for encoders that support SSI, BISS-C or common Fieldbus protocols.

 

Exhibition charts 500 years of evolution of robots

LONDON — Inspired by his belief that human beings are essentially terrified of robots, Ben Russell set about charting the evolution of automatons for an exhibition he hopes will force people to think about how androids and other robotic forms can enhance their lives.

Robots, says Russell, have been with us for centuries — as “Robots,” his exhibit opening Wednesday at London’s Science Museum, shows.

From a 15th century Spanish clockwork monk who kisses his rosary and beats his breast in contrition, to a Japanese “childoid” newsreader, created in 2014 with lifelike facial expressions, the exhibition tracks the development of robotics and mankind’s obsession with replicating itself.

Arnold Schwarzenegger’s unstoppable Terminator cyborg is there, as is Robby the Robot, star of the 1956 film “Forbidden Planet,” representing the horror and the fantasy of robots with minds of their own.

There are also examples of factory production-line machines blamed for taking people’s jobs in recent decades; a “telenoid communications android” for hugging during long-distance phone calls to ease loneliness; and Kaspar, a “minimally expressive social robot” built like a small boy and designed to help ease social interactions for children with autism.

“When you take a long view, as we have done with 500 years of robots, robots haven’t been these terrifying things, they’ve been magical, fascinating, useful, and they generally tend to do what we want them to do,” said Russell, who works at the science museum and was the lead curator of the exhibition.

And while it’s human nature to be worried in the face of change, Russell said, the exhibit should help people “think about what we are as humans” and realize that if robots are “going to come along, you’ve got a stake in how they develop.”

A total of 100 robots are set in five different historic periods in a show that explores how religion, industrialization, pop culture and visions of the future have shaped society.

For Rich Walker, managing director of Shadow Robot Company in London, robotics is about what these increasingly sophisticated machines can do for humans to make life easier, particularly for the elderly or the impaired.

“I’m naturally lazy and got involved so that I could get robots to do things for me,” Walker said. His company has developed a robotic hand that can replicate 24 of the 27 natural movements of the human hand.

As humans have a 1 percent failure rate at repetitive tasks, committing errors about once every two hours, the hand could replace humans on production lines, he said.

Walker concedes further erosion of certain types of jobs if inventions such as his are successful, but says having repetitive tasks performed by automatons would free up people to adopt value-added roles.

“The issue is to rebuild the economy so that it has a holistic approach to employment,” he said.

This in turn leads to questions, raised at the exhibition as well as by the European Union, of whether or not robots should pay taxes on the value of their output as part of the new industrial revolution.

By LYNNE O’DONNELL The Associated Press